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March 2001
Bosnia's War Criminals: Getting Away with Murder
by International Crisis Group
Many of those accused of war crimes [in Bosnia] have successfully diverted the international community's attention from their wartime activities while maintaining significant influence in their local communities. An often-complacent international community and a politically cautious sfor aid them in this endeavor.

March 2001
Deadlocked Romania
by Marian Chiriac
Eleven years after the overthrow of communism, Romania is still searching for solutions to its deeper ills. It is a society in dire need of modernization, burdened with a backward political culture and a ruined economy. The challenge to the political class is how to overcome the patterns set by its predecessors, who introduced formal changes while failing to serve their constituent public.

March 2001
Completing the Transatlantic Bargain: The United States and European Security
by Charles Barry, Sean Kay and Joshua Spero
It is time for a summit to renew the transatlantic commitment by defining a new, more equal balance of influence over transatlantic affairs. America need not fear that outcome; indeed, it hearkens to the bold vision America created with its allies at NATO's conception. The United States must lead in defining a new direction by welcoming the added power of the EU.

March 2001
Post-Milosevic Serbia
by Lenard J. Cohen
The process of democratic consolidation in Serbia has begun in earnest. Equally important, the more virulent xenophobic and authoritarian aspects of Serbian political culture have waned considerably. . . . For the foreseeable future, the specious superpatriotism and discredited soft dictatorship of the Milosevic variety are likely to hold only marginal appeal.

March 2000
Living in the Past: Franjo Tudjman’s Croatia
by Drago Hedl
"Croatian President Franjo Tudjman was a historian who strayed into politics, whose compatriots have already demonstrated how much he strayed into history as a politician; only several weeks after his death they turned their backs on his party, showing that normal life is much more than just making a thousand-year-old dream of an independent state come true."

March 2000
Will Bosnia Survive Dayton?
by James M. B. Lyon
"A review of the Dayton Peace Accords four years after its signing shows that the ethnic cleansers have won: Bosnia is ethnically divided and significant portions of the treaty remain unimplemented. In the words of the December 1998 Madrid meeting of the Peace Implementation Council, Bosnia and Herzegovina's structure remains fragile. Without the scaffolding of inter-national support, it would collapse."

March 2000
Kosovo: “Nobody’s Country”
by Lenard J. Cohen
"Had the international community given more careful attention to the consequences a bombing campaign would have on ethnic relations in Kosovo - or at least made adequate preparations to rapidly police the area following such a campaign - the province's present ethnic segmentation and probable monoethnic future might have been avoided."

March 2000
Globally Wired: Politics in Cyberspace (Third in a Series): Cyberwar or Sideshow? The Internet and the Balkan Wars
by Florian Bieber
"Although the Internet alleviated some information shortages in Yugoslavia during the war in Kosovo, its small audience of users within the country meant that only a minuscule segment of the population was as well informed as many Western media consumers. . . . Still, the Internet gave the independent Yugoslav media tremendous support and helped reduce the isolation that had enveloped Yugoslavia."

March 2000
Macedonia’s Quest for Security and Stability
by Duncan Perry
"If the new [Macedonian] government, like previous governments, confuses motion with progress and fails to deal seriously with interethnic and economic issues, trouble will follow. If, however, it does commence a healing process that involves reform, Macedonia's future will be much more secure."

March 2000
Why Milosevic Still?
by Eric D. Gordy
"Milosevic has so far survived the erosion of his political base by relying on the one instrument he has under his undisputed control: state power. . . . [But] Milosevic does not deserve all the credit for his own improbable survival. Even at his weakest moments it is impossible to overestimate the impact of the opposition's repeated failure to present a credible alternative."

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